The Davis Report- The map

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I am going to address the map of the sand bar that I constructed…item by item, with images from the film. It is important to note that this map was constructed using the film alone, and does not address any of the testimonials. Let’s consider the map I drew of the sandbar:

On the far left is a square that says “log jam” in it.  Here’s a photo of the log jam from the film:

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

Here’s another. This one is a transparency taken from the original film and provided generously by Patricia Patterson, widow of Roger Patterson:

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

Now…let’s consider the pit or hole with the red substance in it:

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

Here’s another frame from a different copy of the film:

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

Here’s a scan of the film strip showing the hole or pit:

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

So…the list of sources goes on and on and they are all sanguine. Just hit the “next” button on the top right hand corner of the page and we will go on to consider the map details further.

The next item on the map would be the camera person’s approach as the film is rolling. Notice that there is a red dot on the drawn item called a “trench”. I’ll show you why I came to this conclusion. First…there is a dramatic change in the ANGLE of the camera towards the subject. In other words the camera person actually DESCENDS BELOW the film subject and is filming from that angle below the subject. Watch this clip. It illustrates this rather well: Double click on the image for animation.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Film work and stabilization by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

The instability of the camera person when the fall into the trench takes place, causes the camera to pan the ground at their feet and reveal some of the trench bottom. Instead of seeing the CREEK, as many have suggested that was there, it’s something very different. The trench bottom contains a small rivulet of red material, similar in look, to what was in the pit, that was discussed earlier. The red rivulet appears in three frames total, as the camera panned the ground. These are the final three frames of the first walk sequence.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

Here’s the second frame:

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

Here’s the third and final frame:

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

The total width of the rivulet at the bottom is not more than a few inches wide. The camera is at “point blank” and BOTH sides can be seen. This is absolutely NOT the creek.

Now let’s consider the SECOND walk sequence. Here’s the animated map with the moving arrow. As you can see, the second walk sequence begins on the film at a different place on the sand bar. Double click on the map to animate and enlarge it.

In the second sequence the “trench” that the camera person went into, is now filled in. How do I know that? Because the same logjam is visible yet the pit and trench are not there. What is there instead is the “outline” of the pit and trench in darker sand. This type of sand is considerably darker when wet, than when dry. So the outline is darker across the sand bar. Here’s a panorama of stitched images that show the sandbar , along with the darker sand in the outline of the pit and trench where they were:

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

In the photo below there is an inset picture of the log jam from the FIRST walk sequence. The stitched panorama are all frames from the SECOND walk sequence. As you can see…this is the very same log jam, except that the pit and trench are gone and only their outlines in freshly turned over darker moister sand can be seen.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

Here’s that same area from another angle:

Copyright by Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

Now comes the item on the map that says “First look back”. What do I mean by “first” look back? In the middle of the part of the film that has a lot of shaky hand motion in it, the subject appears to stop and look back at the camera, and then proceed again. This is BEFORE the famous look back that is so easily seen later. Here is a stabilized clip that illustrates this. Double click on the image to animate.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Film work and stabilization by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

The next thing on the map to address are the round impressions in the sand that appear to be “horse” prints. While there isn’t a horse standing in them at the time of the filming, they have the appearance of horse prints and will go down as such here. This is right in front of the famous log and this image is from the original film and is the very best image of this part of the sand bar.

The next item on the map to address is what appears to be a “hand” print on the famous log that is front of the camera person and the film subject. The very best images from the film must be used to clearly see this. This is from frame 352 of the original film and provided generously by Patricia Patterson…widow of Roger Patterson, in the form of a 4×5 transparency that is the best image available from the film. Click on the image to enlarge.

Here’s an enlargement of  the print. Click on the photo to enlarge.

Here’s the print from another source. This is from a platen image, in other words, a paper print, that Roger Patterson was selling at his live showings of the film. The quality is good enough here to see the print there on the log:

As you can see, this was and is…on the film. No one put it there other than the film maker when the event occurred. This is why this film has so much to offer. A planned or “hoaxed” event is carefully controlled and contains only what the creator wants in it. This film…to the contrary, contains a plethora of anomalies that might be expected if the film maker has no control over the conditions of the film. In other words, it’s unlikely to be a hoax. M.K.

The next item on the map would be the SECOND look back, which is the famous look back at the camera while walking in the wide open stance, that is seen so much on television documentaries. Here’s a still frame numbered frame 352. It is from the original film and is of the highest quality. It has been generously provided by Patricia Patterson, the widow of Roger Patterson.

Copyright by Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis

Here’s a clip showing the famous second look back in oscillating fashion. Click on the image to enlarge and animate.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Film work and stabilization by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

This brings us to the leg bulge. There is a lot of speculation as to what the bulge on the leg is. I’m going to present it as it is on the film. I was not the first to find this on the film. I did pay particular attention to the area when making my analysis to see if this was indeed part of the event or perhaps some anomaly on the film itself. When I got the very best images to work with I began to pick up the bulge in more than one frame. More importantly the bulge has a “shadow” beneath it that is consistent with the sun angle and the other shadows on the body. So…I feel confident that the bulge is actually part of the event. So…let’s take a look at it. Notice the shadow beneath the bulge.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

Now…this is the very next frame. This happens to be frame 352. This is from the original film, and was generously provided by Patricia Patterson, the widow of Roger Patterson. It is of very high quality. There appears at the spot of the bulge, this next frame, a round concentric pattern. You are free to make of it what you will, but it certainly is there on the film. Click on the image to animate.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

The leg anomaly continues in frame 353. There are three main frames where the bulge can be seen. 351,352,and 353. Here are five frames starting with 350 and ending with 354. This is run at slow speed. Click on the image to animate.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Film work and stabilization by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

Here is the same images only this time they are run at full speed. It appears that something violent occurred with the right leg of the film subject at this juncture of the film. Click on the image to animate.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Film work and stabilization by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

We are at the point where the map shows that there are some footprints in front of the famous log in the film. These footprints are only visible on the very highest quality images from the film. Once again let us refer to this image provided by Patricia Patterson, widow of Roger Patterson. Click on the image to animate. Follow the zoom to see the footprints. They are shallow and at an oblique angle. That is why they only show on the highest quality prints. Also notice the paw print at the bottom of the image. This print is on a rise of sand in the foreground that is difficult to see. The oblique prints are quite a bit further in front. This paw print was “cropped” out of every version of the film except this one graciously provided by Patricia Patterson. It’s a key piece of information.

Image provided by Patricia Patterson. Filmwork and animation by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

 

In the SECOND walk sequence, this is where the camera person first stops to film. Notice how far away the log is here.

 

Now notice that the camera person has approached the log, and is filming from right above the log. This is the SECOND stop to film in the SECOND walk sequence. Click on the image to animate.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

 

 

The Davis Report- Not a continuous film continued…

The next photo shows the filmstrip itself, at that concise point in the film where the two walk sequences join. There are no indications that this is a start stop of the camera. Rather…it is an abrupt SCENE change with no interlude. The same kind of scene change that a person might see in a Hollywood movie that has been finished editing and is ready for the theaters. In this filmstrip image the top frames are the first walk sequence. Patterson has fallen into a trench or ditch, and is actually filming from BELOW Patty…up at her. In the bottom frames or the beginning of the second walk sequence, Patterson is filming on a similar level as Patty. Patty is hidden behind the limb or stick in the center of the frame but emerges quickly a frame or two later. I refer back a page to the animated walk sequences to see this. Here is the image.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here are a couple of maps of the sand bar as can be reconstructed from the film itself. Due to inconsistencies in the storyline, the film is the only touchstone for what happened down there, that may be relied on. Here’s the map for the first walk sequence. These are animated maps. They will animate right here in the post on their own.

Here’s the second animated map for the second walk sequence illustrated.

The Davis Report-The Patterson film is NOT a continuous piece of footage.

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I understand that this kind of reporting can be controversial, but it need not be so. Honest hearted truth seekers should be willing to look at the film objectively without being so attached to the storyline and the storytellers that they are willing to overlook glaring inconsistencies in the film. The actual footage involving the Sasquatch is about 60 seconds in its entirety. It is filmed in two parts that I call “Walk Sequences”. The first “Walk Sequence” starts with the Sasquatch walking away from a hole or pit with a red substance in it. This clip that I am about to show is from a very good quality version of the film. When I say very good quality, I mean that the correct blue-gray color of the sand bar is present on the film. It has not been washed white from the copying process. The color of the substance in the pit is sanguine. Follow the clip to the end of the first walk sequence and you may be surprised that “Patty” actually falls forward, bending completely over with the buttocks directly pointed at the camera. This is when the FIRST walk sequence ends. The second sequence starts in another time and place on the sand bar, but first…it will be the first walk sequence… double click on the image for animation.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Film work and stabilization by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

Here’s a clip that shows the final part of the first walk sequence. This is a little easier to follow. At the end, it oscillates back and forth so the viewer may follow the distinct changes in posture…double click on the image to animate.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Film work and stabilization by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

In the next clip, the SECOND walk sequence will begin. It begins at a totally different place on the sand bar, and apparently, a different TIME as well. If you noticed the log jam over the pit of red in the first walk sequence, you will see that same log jam here in the second sequence as well. However…the pit is gone, and Patty is not bending down, but rather, is in a totally different position on the sand bar, and moving upstream with an fast walk. Double click on the image to animate…

Continue on next page by clicking on “next” on the upper right corner of the page.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Film work and stabilization by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

The Davis Report

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This post is regarding the head and head hair. I will be returning to this topic often as I make my way through an extensive collection of images and clips from the film. This photo is from the Argosy Magazine interview with Roger Patterson and Robert Gimlin published in Nov. 1968. This photo is NOT found among the cibachrome prints produced by Bruce Bonney in 1980. The image has had the magazine printing artifacts significantly reduced to produce a smooth photo. Take a good look at the head hair here. Double click to enlarge. Left to right are different levels of enhancement in removing the dot matrix.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

 

The Davis Report

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The mouth area is a bit indistinct in the generated copies. However the area around the mouth does contain valuable information. Once the contrast is boosted on the stills they can be aligned so that the mouth remains stabilized. When the film is then run, a “cinematic effect” occurs. In other words, the previous image is still in the mind when the next image is being shown. This produces a cumulative effect of all the frames and the effect is that the mouth can be seen to move. Here is a collection of the stills that are used in the animated sequence. All but two are taken from a multi-gen copy of the film. One frame is from a transparency provided by Patricia Patterson. Another frame is from 323 of an Argosy article about the film from November 1968. Right click on the images for animation and enlargement.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Film work and stabilization by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

 

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Film work and stabilization by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

 

The Davis Report

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There are about as many opinions about the nature of a Sasquatch thumb as there are Sasquatch researchers. The Patterson film has a lot to say about the thumb if a person can stabilize that area so that its subtle movements can be observed. This has been done in the clips below. Notice the left arm. It has been held steady through film stabilization and the thumb can indeed be seen to move on the left hand. It has every appearance of an opposable thumb.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork and stabilization by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork and stabilization by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

The Davis Report

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Film stabilization helps enormously in being able to see the detail in a moving image. Another helpful tool to observe film such as the Patterson footage, is to create an oscillating file. This file simply rocks back and forth through the selected sequence so that the movement can be detected more easily with the eye. In this file below, the muscles of the shoulder and back area can be seen to move naturally as the film subject walks in front of the camera. This type of musculature movement bears the stamp of authenticity. What or whoever this is…is not likely a person dressed in a suit. Take a look for yourself.

Double click to animate the image.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork and stabilization by M.K.Davis. Please don't right click without permission.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork and stabilization by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

The Davis Report

This post is about the hair on the head of the Patterson film subject and what the film shows of it. One must remember that the film is rather low contrast, which makes much of the hair detail sort of blend homogeneously. There is enough difference in the tones, however, that with filtering, the hair patterns become evident. In this clip below, filtration is applied which results in a black and white clip that has had the contrast boosted to show a much improved image as far as the hair on the head is concerned. Watch the hair blow from off the head, and around and over the ear. The clip will oscillate back and forth so that this can be readily seen.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Film work and stabilization by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Here’s a clip without the delay:

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Film work and stabilization by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When the hair swings over the ear, the ear is exposed to the camera for a few seconds. Here is the ear. On the left is the raw image, on the right is the enhanced image. What are your thoughts? Does the ear look like a “normal” ear to you? M.K.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click.

 

The Davis Report

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Here is a clip from the film that has been inverted. When I say “inverted”, I mean “mirror inverted”. No data has changed except that the film subject is walking right to left. It’s like looking at the Patterson film in a mirror. This is mostly helpful when many hours have been spent on the film. Running it in this fashion tends to hold the attention of the analyst when the burden of viewing the film in the correct orientation has become great. Perhaps it might freshen it a bit for you. Here’s the clip:( It’s a large file. It may take time to load but worth the wait. Double click on the image to animate.)

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Film work and stabilization by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

The Davis Report

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In years past we trusted the scientific establishment for the explanations that we needed for life and for living. We were supposed to…weren’t we? These were our learned men and women. These men and women had been to University and duly trained in the ways of the honest pursuit of truth. Yet…despite having certification to vouch for the veracity of these ones, certain ones do succumb to the trappings of the human condition, and bend the facts, sometimes to the breaking point, to fit a pet idea or notion and they “notarize” these facts with their preeminent qualifications, without the allowance for dissent. It has proven to be no different with this anomalous piece of footage called the Patterson Sasquatch film. The famous professor Grover Krantz from Washington State has gone on record many times in the past, both in lecture, and in the media, with a description of the Patterson subject as having possessed the Apelike quality of not being able to turn the neck. Dr.Krantz cited this as evidence that what we were looking at was a bipedal ape because it had to turn its ENTIRE body around toward you in order to look at you. He used the film itself as the touchstone of proof. Let’s take a look below at the clip from the film that he was basing this on.                                              

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork and stabilizations by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click.

What was not shown, however, were the physical actions of the film subject only a few seconds later when the movement of the neck becomes more abundantly apparent. To cite an immobile neck as evidence for being some kind of ape, while KNOWING that the example below existed in the film is WHY we should keep our skepticals on. A PHD beside a name or, in some cases, worn out on the sleeve, is NOT a guarantee of veracity, competence, or correctness. Many such ones have become media darlings with this film becoming a cash cow for both them and the media in a loose collusion. My suggestion for those who want to know what it is that is on the film in all honesty, is to look at the film itself with an objective eye. Do not lionize these men. They have ridden this piece of film nearly to death and seem certain to abandon it in the miasma of uncertainty forever, “IF” they have their way. Take a look below…do YOU see neck movement? M.K. ( Click on “next” in upper right of page for the next page ).

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Film work and stabilization by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.