The Davis Report- The map

I am going to address the map of the sand bar that I constructed…item by item, with images from the film. It is important to note that this map was constructed using the film alone, and does not address any of the testimonials. Let’s consider the map I drew of the sandbar:

On the far left is a square that says “log jam” in it.  Here’s a photo of the log jam from the film:

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

Here’s another. This one is a transparency taken from the original film and provided generously by Patricia Patterson, widow of Roger Patterson:

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

Now…let’s consider the pit or hole with the red substance in it:

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

Here’s another frame from a different copy of the film:

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

Here’s a scan of the film strip showing the hole or pit:

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

So…the list of sources goes on and on and they are all sanguine. Just hit the “next” button on the top right hand corner of the page and we will go on to consider the map details further.

The next item on the map would be the camera person’s approach as the film is rolling. Notice that there is a red dot on the drawn item called a “trench”. I’ll show you why I came to this conclusion. First…there is a dramatic change in the ANGLE of the camera towards the subject. In other words the camera person actually DESCENDS BELOW the film subject and is filming from that angle below the subject. Watch this clip. It illustrates this rather well: Double click on the image for animation.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Film work and stabilization by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

The instability of the camera person when the fall into the trench takes place, causes the camera to pan the ground at their feet and reveal some of the trench bottom. Instead of seeing the CREEK, as many have suggested that was there, it’s something very different. The trench bottom contains a small rivulet of red material, similar in look, to what was in the pit, that was discussed earlier. The red rivulet appears in three frames total, as the camera panned the ground. These are the final three frames of the first walk sequence.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

Here’s the second frame:

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

Here’s the third and final frame:

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

The total width of the rivulet at the bottom is not more than a few inches wide. The camera is at “point blank” and BOTH sides can be seen. This is absolutely NOT the creek.

Now let’s consider the SECOND walk sequence. Here’s the animated map with the moving arrow. As you can see, the second walk sequence begins on the film at a different place on the sand bar. Double click on the map to animate and enlarge it.

In the second sequence the “trench” that the camera person went into, is now filled in. How do I know that? Because the same logjam is visible yet the pit and trench are not there. What is there instead is the “outline” of the pit and trench in darker sand. This type of sand is considerably darker when wet, than when dry. So the outline is darker across the sand bar. Here’s a panorama of stitched images that show the sandbar , along with the darker sand in the outline of the pit and trench where they were:

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

In the photo below there is an inset picture of the log jam from the FIRST walk sequence. The stitched panorama are all frames from the SECOND walk sequence. As you can see…this is the very same log jam, except that the pit and trench are gone and only their outlines in freshly turned over darker moister sand can be seen.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

Here’s that same area from another angle:

Copyright by Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

Now comes the item on the map that says “First look back”. What do I mean by “first” look back? In the middle of the part of the film that has a lot of shaky hand motion in it, the subject appears to stop and look back at the camera, and then proceed again. This is BEFORE the famous look back that is so easily seen later. Here is a stabilized clip that illustrates this. Double click on the image to animate.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Film work and stabilization by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

The next thing on the map to address are the round impressions in the sand that appear to be “horse” prints. While there isn’t a horse standing in them at the time of the filming, they have the appearance of horse prints and will go down as such here. This is right in front of the famous log and this image is from the original film and is the very best image of this part of the sand bar.

The next item on the map to address is what appears to be a “hand” print on the famous log that is front of the camera person and the film subject. The very best images from the film must be used to clearly see this. This is from frame 352 of the original film and provided generously by Patricia Patterson…widow of Roger Patterson, in the form of a 4×5 transparency that is the best image available from the film. Click on the image to enlarge.

Here’s an enlargement of  the print. Click on the photo to enlarge.

Here’s the print from another source. This is from a platen image, in other words, a paper print, that Roger Patterson was selling at his live showings of the film. The quality is good enough here to see the print there on the log:

As you can see, this was and is…on the film. No one put it there other than the film maker when the event occurred. This is why this film has so much to offer. A planned or “hoaxed” event is carefully controlled and contains only what the creator wants in it. This film…to the contrary, contains a plethora of anomalies that might be expected if the film maker has no control over the conditions of the film. In other words, it’s unlikely to be a hoax. M.K.

The next item on the map would be the SECOND look back, which is the famous look back at the camera while walking in the wide open stance, that is seen so much on television documentaries. Here’s a still frame numbered frame 352. It is from the original film and is of the highest quality. It has been generously provided by Patricia Patterson, the widow of Roger Patterson.

Copyright by Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis

Here’s a clip showing the famous second look back in oscillating fashion. Click on the image to enlarge and animate.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Film work and stabilization by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

This brings us to the leg bulge. There is a lot of speculation as to what the bulge on the leg is. I’m going to present it as it is on the film. I was not the first to find this on the film. I did pay particular attention to the area when making my analysis to see if this was indeed part of the event or perhaps some anomaly on the film itself. When I got the very best images to work with I began to pick up the bulge in more than one frame. More importantly the bulge has a “shadow” beneath it that is consistent with the sun angle and the other shadows on the body. So…I feel confident that the bulge is actually part of the event. So…let’s take a look at it. Notice the shadow beneath the bulge.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

Now…this is the very next frame. This happens to be frame 352. This is from the original film, and was generously provided by Patricia Patterson, the widow of Roger Patterson. It is of very high quality. There appears at the spot of the bulge, this next frame, a round concentric pattern. You are free to make of it what you will, but it certainly is there on the film. Click on the image to animate.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

The leg anomaly continues in frame 353. There are three main frames where the bulge can be seen. 351,352,and 353. Here are five frames starting with 350 and ending with 354. This is run at slow speed. Click on the image to animate.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Film work and stabilization by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

Here is the same images only this time they are run at full speed. It appears that something violent occurred with the right leg of the film subject at this juncture of the film. Click on the image to animate.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Film work and stabilization by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

We are at the point where the map shows that there are some footprints in front of the famous log in the film. These footprints are only visible on the very highest quality images from the film. Once again let us refer to this image provided by Patricia Patterson, widow of Roger Patterson. Click on the image to animate. Follow the zoom to see the footprints. They are shallow and at an oblique angle. That is why they only show on the highest quality prints. Also notice the paw print at the bottom of the image. This print is on a rise of sand in the foreground that is difficult to see. The oblique prints are quite a bit further in front. This paw print was “cropped” out of every version of the film except this one graciously provided by Patricia Patterson. It’s a key piece of information.

Image provided by Patricia Patterson. Filmwork and animation by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

 

In the SECOND walk sequence, this is where the camera person first stops to film. Notice how far away the log is here.

 

Now notice that the camera person has approached the log, and is filming from right above the log. This is the SECOND stop to film in the SECOND walk sequence. Click on the image to animate.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

 

 

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