The Davis Report-Patty Stripped of Hair.

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This is what I believe the Patterson film subject would have looked like, if stripped of body hair. First the raw image generously provided by Patricia Patterson. Then the clip proceeds on to enhancement of the image to produce contrast. Then the area beneath the arm on the side of the torso, that is devoid of hair, the skin texture was cloned onto the rest of the body with great care to produce, what I believe is the likeness of “Patty” without body hair. The hair on top of the head was not done this way. On the torso of “Patty” you will see a black dot. This is the area that was cloned onto the rest of the skin surface. Click on the image to animate.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

 

The Davis Report-The Early Parts of the Film

This is a panorama of the sand bar in the very first moments of the filming.Click on the image to animate it.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Film work and stabilization by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

 

Here’s a repeating file of the very shaky, earliest part of the filming. Click on the image to animate it.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Film work and stabilization by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

 

 

This file shows something falling away from the left leg of the film subject. It’s hard to tell what it is. What do you think it is? Click on the image to animate it.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Film work and stabilization by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

 

 

The Davis Report-The Gastrocnemius(or calf) Muscle.

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In several places in the film, the calf or Gastrocnemius muscles can be seen on the back of the lower leg. This argues significantly against a boot such as in a suit. Here’s a clip showing such. Click on the image to animate.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Film work and stabilization by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

 

 

Here’s a filtered image that shows the muscle tighten. Click on the image to animate.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Film work and stabilization by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

 

The Davis Report-Footprints in the Sand.

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Are there any footprints that are visible in the Patterson film? The answer is…yes. In the very high quality prints both platen and transparency, the more subtle details are certainly visible. Here is an image, taken from the film in the form of a platen image. A platen image is a paper print. This image was being sold at Mr. Patterson’s live events and it is of superb quality. Watch carefully as contrast is boosted and filtration applied. Click on the image to animate.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

In the photo below, the film subject is seen actually making…or standing in…the prints. The only thing that is really odd, is that the right print seems to be on the left and the left print on the right. A “stepover” type of maneuver would be required to do this. Take a look at this still.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

Now…let’s take a look at the film and see if such a crossover maneuver did take place. In this animation, a semi-transparent clip is overlain across a frame from later in the film, in order to see if there is a step over maneuver and did it take place at that exact spot. Here’s the clip. Click on the image to animate it.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

Here’s a clip that demonstrates the depth of one of the prints. I’m guessing “Patty” to weigh somewhere in the neighborhood of 300 lbs. Click on the image to animate it.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

Some have said that the sand bar was very hard and compacted. It does not show that to be true in the film however. There was a logging road that WAS compacted and hardened with lime, but the sand bar was soft were there was not rock. Here’s a clip that shows this. In the clip, the left foot is being dragged toes down in the sand and across a wooden stick. The loose sand accumulates on the toes and when the foot is planted suddenly, the loose sand goes airborne and hits the ground “after” the foot plants. This has been mistakenly interpreted as the foot itself flexing. These images should clear that up. Here’s the first one. Click on the image to animate it.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Film work and stabilization by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

Now…here is a slower version of it. Watch the toes dig into the sand and actually deposit some sand on the stick. The foot continues forward and and then plants briskly. The sand on the toes goes airborne and then lands a split second later. Good images do make a difference in understanding the film Click on the image to animate it.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Film work and stabilization by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

The Davis Report-The White Feet

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Many people wonder at the “whiteness” of the foot bottoms when the Patterson film subject lifts the foot bottoms toward the camera view. There seems to be different levels of coverage as well. What I have found, through enhancement, is that the “whiteness” is sand from the creek bed. Once again, as has been discussed on this blog before, the sand is crushed shale. Shale sand in that area is blue gray when dry, and dark blue to almost black when moistened. The Patterson film subject walks across an area of darker sand just before the foot bottom is seen. After stepping past the moist sand onto dry sand, it appears that there was significant dryer sand stuck to the moist foot bottom. I was able to use filtering to reduce the amount of chromatic aberration in the image. Chromatic aberration is when the lens of the camera does not bring “all” colors of the spectrum to the same sharp focus. The colors that remain unsharp contribute to the overall “unsharpness” of the image, and when filtered from the image, the sharpness increases significantly. This is a technique that has worked well for for a century or more, and is not new. Here’s the foot bottom using this type of enhancement. Click on the image to animate.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Film work and stabilization by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

In this clip, many detractors of the film note that the foot is “squareish” and therefore must be some kind of foot platform or fake shoe. When enhancement is applied to the image, it becomes apparent the the toes are being held in a nearly perpendicular angle to the foot bottom. This is not that unusual. Many people can do this. Click on the image to animate.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Film work and stabilization by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

Overexposure is also another reason for things that are not white to the eye, to turn out white on film. In this next clip you will see the subject stroll in and out of light beams that are filtering through the trees on the canyon walls. Watch the “white” travel up the leg as the leg passes through the beam of light. Click on the image to animate.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Film work and stabilization by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

The Davis Report-The Body Hair

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When it comes to the subject of “body” hair on the Patterson film subject, many people assume that there is a uniform coverage of hair. Actually the hair and the skin are two different tones or color “temperatures”. This provides the analyst with the opportunity to use the colors to determine the level of hair coverage across the image. The colors of the skin and hair can be “driven” apart through the interaction colors that are introduced to the image. Blue and yellow make green, but blue and red make maroon, so…an image that has yellow and red in it, when blue is introduced, would produce a two colored image that is green and red, with the green and red being easily divergent. Now in the animated sequence here,  the image is first introduced with red, and then green. This “drives” apart the tones of the skin and hair and it becomes clear the level of hair coverage over the skin. Click on the image to animate.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Film work and stabilization by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

Here’s a clip from the film that has been filtered to sharpen the image and boost contrast. It is displayed in black and white. The level of hair coverage becomes more obvious. Click on the image to animate.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Film work and stabilization by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

Here’s a very high quality still that was taken from the original Patterson film. It was generously provided by Patricia Patterson, the widow of Roger Patterson. The hair and skin tones are driven apart here in this false color image. It’s easy to see the skin beneath the hair in this image. Click on the image to enlarge.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

Here’s an enlargement of the right leg. The hair coverage is much more sparse and less encompassing than many have believed over the years.The knee cap or patella can be seen here as well as many other anatomical features. What do you see?

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

Here’s the right arm…done the same way.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

 

Here’s an oscillating clip that shows the interplay of light upon the film subject’s body. The skin can be seen beneath the hair. Click on the image to animate.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Film work and stabilization by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

Here’s the armswing animation in full color and enlarged. Hairy but not furry. Click on the image to animate.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Film work and stabilization by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

The Davis Report- The Breasts of the Patterson Sasquatch

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This is frame 354 of the Patterson Sasquatch film. This angle shows the breasts well. I’m not real keen on explaining a lot about the type of enhancement that this is. The reason is that some other film analysts have shown more than a hankering for imitation and then claiming it’s original. So…I’ll just show the end result. Here’s frame 354 after enhancement of the breast area. Remember this is a SCIENTIFIC pursuit. I hope that you all see it that way.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Film work and stabilization by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

Now…this is information that is ACTUALLY on the film. I have demonstrated this many times for different groups, how to perform these enhancements and WHY they work. Now let’s look at some animations from several such enhancements.Yes these are breasts and nipples, and yes they are real. Click on the image to animate.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

Here’s another animation that includes more frames. Click on the image to animate.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Film work and stabilization by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

Here’s a still from one of the high quality transparencies graciously provided by Patricia Patterson, widow of Roger Patterson. The area around the breasts have been enhanced but because of the quality of the still, did not need it all that much.

Copyright Patricia Patterson. Filmwork by M.K.Davis. Please do not right click without permission.

I hope that you can see that this type of detail shows lifelike qualities at normal speed and the film subject certainly which possesses these endowments, must certainly be real. M.K.